Types of Logistic Zones

Types of Logistic Zones

The main criteria that distinguish logistic zones is related to their relation with transport terminals and the array of services present:

  • Intermodal Co-location. A direct integration with an intermodal terminal, which involves an adjacent setting. Port-centric logistic zones are co-located by a port terminal, which is often the outcome of a strategy spearheaded by port authorities. An inland port (or dry port) has a similar co-location setting, but in this case with an intermodal rail terminal (on some occasions with a barge terminal) along a inland transport corridor. Various actors are involved in the setting of these logistic zones, such as local governments, rail operators and commercial real estate developers.
  • Intermodal Proximity. A step below co-location is a relative proximity to an intermodal terminal (port or rail), which characterizes logistics parks. Although they were not established directly in relation to an inland terminal, they are connected to the facility as a customer. If there are no direct proximity or relation to an intermodal terminal, then the logistic zone is simply an industrial park taking advantage of available land and road access.
  • Freight services. A freight village represents a specific logistic zone in the sense that it has a high orientation towards services such as hotels, convention centers and office space for third party logistics providers. They thus have a wide variety of potential settings, but are often found within logistics parks.